Inside Views @ LIP

Com as Inside Views terás a oportunidade de conhecer diferentes centros de investigação relacionados com física em Lisboa. Uma Inside View é uma tour exclusiva a um centro de investigação do IST, guiada por um investigador do centro.

Conseguirás perceber todo o processo científico: partindo da ideia, ultrapasssando obstáculos, atingindo assim um resultado.

AMS

Coordinator: Prof. Fernando Barão

Place: LabRC in IST

AMS is a broad international collaboration operating a cosmic-ray observatory installed on the International Space Station (ISS). ESA and NASA are two of the main supporting organizations for the experiment. The main goals of AMS are to perform a detailed measurement of the cosmic-ray spectrum, to search for cosmological antimatter and to search for dark matter. The LIP group is centered in the RICH subdetector and in AMS data analysis, particularly the study of the solar modulation effect in cosmic rays.
This presentation occurs in the Cosmic Rays Laboratory at IST, on the top of the Physics Pavillion, in which cosmic rays are also discussed
along with detectors and analysis techniques.

  • 8 vagas

ATLAS

The LHC is currently the most potent hadron accelerator in the world used to study the fundamental particles. Our team is part of the international collaboration of physicists and engineers that operates the gigantic ATLAS experience at CERN. This experiment records the proton or lead-ion collisions that we have discussed below to try to answer some of the most fundamental issues in today’s physics. During these visits the students will be able to have contact with the group and discuss with researchers and PhD students not only the challenges and opportunities in each of these areas, but also know what it means to work in an international, competitive and as challenging environment as the CERN.

Coordinator: Prof. Patrícia Conde-Muíño

Place: LIP

Higgs

How does the Higgs boson interact, which we discovered a few years ago? We believe that the particle is found at the origin of the mass of all elementary particles. But to know if it really behaves as predicted in theory we have to study in detail its properties. If we find out that they are different than expected, we may have the first evidence of new physics in the LHC!

  • 5 vagas

Heavy Ions

How did the plasma of quarks and gluons behave, this very dense and hot state of matter that existed shortly after the Big Bang? This plasma, which we are able to recreate by colliding lead ions into colossal energies, has very different properties from normal matter. We can “look” at its interior by examining jets of particles that cross it. It is a unique opportunity to study the subject under extreme conditions!

  • 5 vagas

Advanced Processing

The collisions occur in the LHC every 25 nanoseconds (40 million times per second). Of these, only very few are interesting for physics studies. In order to be able to analyze and identify interesting collisions in real time we use the most advanced electronic and computer systems. Our group is a leader in the jet picking system, and we are already developing advanced algorithms that will be used in the next evolution of the LHC in 2020.

  • 5 vagas

Auger

The LIP participates in the Pierre Auger Observatory, which studies the cosmic rays of extreme energies.

These very rare particles (~ 1 / century / km ^ 2) collide with Earth’s atmosphere producing gigantic particle showers that can be detected. The study of these particles allows to explore the most violent phenomena of the Universe. In addition, their interaction with the atmosphere occurs at energies well above those available at the LHC, providing a unique window to explore new physics in the
energy of 100 TeV. LIP participates in the Observatory covering a wide range of
ranging from new detector concepts to complex data analyzes, and also
characterize the physics of the shower.

Visit at the Remote Control Room

Coordinator: Prof. Pedro Assis

Place: IST

On this visit it is proposed to talk about the Observatory
and the data analyzes performed there, which allow the perception of the nature of the interactions and particles at the highest energies, taking into account the background of the remote control system of the detectors installed in the Observatory.

  • 8 vagas

Visit to LIP

Coordinator: Prof. Pedro Assis

Place: LIP

At LIP we will talk about the detectors to be developed for the Observatory, against the background of the various prototypes in operation in the LIP.
The topics of physics and data analysis can also be addressed here.

  • 5 vagas

Muons Tomography

Coordinator: Prof. Sofia Andringa

Place: LIP

The passage of muons by matter depends on its density. Detectors will be installed in mines to obtain a tomography
of the Earth and to study, using muons, the density distribution in the zone near the mine.

  • 5 vagas

CMS – New Physics Research at Large Hadron Collider

Meeting with LIP researchers in the CMS / CERN experience: an opportunity to learn about new physics research at the LHC. The LHC is the most powerful particle accelerator in the world, is located at CERN, and allows to explore the constituents of matter at the most fundamental level. LIP is a founding member of the CMS experience and was responsible for the design and construction of important detector components. Several areas of the LHC’s physics program were led by LIP members who contributed among others to the discovery of the Higgs boson in 2012. The group is actively involved in analyzing the latest data in the following areas of physics: Higgs boson, quark top, quark b, supersymmetry, electroweak interaction, strong interaction and quark and gluon plasma.

Coordinator: Prof. João Varela

Place: LIP

Higgs & SUSY

After the discovery of the Higgs boson in the LHC, it has become important to determine whether this new particle is part of a more comprehensive theory that remains unknown at this time. Physicists in the LIP CMS group are investigating this possibility through new modes of production and decay of the Higgs button and by measuring its properties. Like other great discoveries, the discovery of the Higgs boson answers questions
fundamental, in this case that of the origin of the mass of the elementary particles, bringing at the same time new questions that we see as problems or challenges.
Searches for supersymmetry (Susy) are another major research axis of the LHC, pursued in our group. Susy, apart from solving problems with the Higgs mechanism, can explain the cold dark matter observed in the Universe, as well as unify the microscopic interactions with gravity. All of these researches are carried out with cutting-edge tools, such as machine-learning (ML) methods. Students have the possibility to contribute to these searches, in particular by improving ML tools.

  • 5 vagas

Heavy Flavour and QGP

Beauty and charm as probes of strong interaction. Strong interaction is the most intense of Nature’s forces. It binds the quarks in the protons and neutrons of the atomic nuclei, determining the intimate structure of the visible world: 99% of visible matter is a tangible manifestation of strong force. Yet our present understanding of this force is still primitive: we do not quite realize how protons and neutrons, blocks of visible matter, are formed from the three quarks of which each is constituted. In fact, the simplest prototypes of elementary systems governed by strong force are the so-called quarkonium particles, made up only of a pair of quarks, charm and anticharm or beauty and antibeauty. The study of how quarkonia states are formed can be seen as the equivalent of determining Kepler’s laws (basic phenomenological relationships between observables) of strong-force dynamics, something that does not yet exist today. The LIP team investigates the nature of the strong interaction and primordial quarks and gluon soup properties by exploiting the proton-proton and heavy-ion collisions that take place in the LHC using innovative probes based on heavy quarks.

  • 5 vagas

Detector improvements

Detectors of the next decade are getting ready today. The future high-luminosity LHC (HL-LHC) will allow a considerable expansion of the physics program. The environment will be characterized by a very high density of collisions, which in turn poses great challenges to the detectors that will operate in it. The large “upgrade” of detectors for HL-LHC operation takes place from 2018 to 2023. LIP has played an important role in the construction and development of detectors and electronics used in the LHC. At present, the group leads the new proton spectrometer (PPS) integrated in the CMS detector in 2016, which allows the analysis of photon-photon interactions in the LHC. The development and testing of electronics for the next generation of CMS detectors is also one of the foci of LIP. The group is one of the proponents of the Timing Detector, a new detector to be installed in CMS, that will allow to distinguish temporarily the collisions in the HL-LHC. In the development of associated electronics we also benefit from synergies with detection systems developed in the context of medical physics applications (namely, PET imaging).

  • 5 vagas

Coordinator: Prof. Catarina Quintans

Place: LIP

The COMPASS group of LIP proposes an interactive journey through experience, from detector control to data acquisition, reconstruction and analysis. Experience seeks to understand the origin of one of the fundamental properties of hadronic matter: spin.
Some of the most relevant results obtained in recent years will be shown from a practical perspective: how, from a concrete measure of an observable we come to conclusions about the physics that governs the nucleons.

  • 10 vagas

Coordinator: Prof. Patrícia Gonçalves

Place: LIP

The activities related to space / ESA are based on the previous experience of LIP in the areas of radiation interaction, radiation detection and instrumentation experiments for experimental particle physics. The activities developed began with the application of the Geant4 simulation tool to astroparticle experiments in a first contract concluded between LIP and the European Space Agency (ESA) in 2003. Since then, the work developed has been supported mainly by contracts between the LIP and the ESA, the LIP being wholly or partly responsible for the projects. You can come to know the people who work in this area and get involved in these projects!

  • 0 vagas

Phenomenology

Coordinator: Prof. Guilherme Milhano

Place: LIP

LIP’s Phenomenology group, LIP-Pheno, conducts research bridging theory and experiment in particle and astroparticle physics. Its research, while independent, is centred around areas in which LIP has active experimental activities and aims to identify areas in which LIP’s broader programme may evolve in the future. Its founding purpose is to strengthen the impact of the overall LIP programme through the provision of excellent directed phenomenological research.

  • 10 vagas

Neutrinos

Coordinator: Prof. José Maneira

Place: LIP

Neutrinos, the puzzling elementary particles, with neutral electric charge and tiny mass, interact with matter very rarely, and are among the most abundant particles in the Universe. The LIP neutrino physics team was created in 2005 to participate in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) and now participates in both the SNO+ and DUNE experiments. SNO+ is taking data right now in SNOLAB, an ultra-clean underground laboratory in Canada, and carrying out measurements of neutrinos from the Sun, nuclear reactors and other rare processes. Once we load the detector with almost 4 tonnes of Tellurium, the main goal is the observation of neutrinoless double beta decay to probe the possible Majorana character of neutrinos and measure its absolute mass.
DUNE aims at measuring differences in the oscillations of muon neutrinos and muon anti-neutrinos, that would indicate violation of the CP symmetry in the lepton sector. It is a new major worldwide project, that will still take years to build, but there is much to do to design the experiment and test prototypes.

  • 10 vagas

Coordinators: Prof. Luís Peralta and Prof. Daniel Galaviz

Place: FCUL

Visit to the laboratories of Nuclear Physics in Building C8 of the Faculty of Sciences of the University of Lisbon (Campo Grande),
where we can show how to make a fine target for an experiment with medium energy beams (for example in ISOLDE) and
as you measure its thickness (without breaking it!).

  • 10 vagas